302 KAR 10:080. Shell, albumen and yolk specifications.

 

      RELATES TO: KRS 260.620

      STATUTORY AUTHORITY: KRS 260.560, 260.620

      NECESSITY, FUNCTION, AND CONFORMITY: This administrative regulation prescribes shell, albumen, and yolk specifications.

 

      Section 1. The shell requirements in the standards of quality for individual eggs shall be governed by the following specifications:

      (1) Clean: a shell that is free from foreign matter, and from stains or discolorations that are readily visible. Eggs with only very small specks or stains may be considered clean, if such eggs are not of sufficient number in a package to detract appreciably from its appearance. Eggs that show traces of processing oil on the shell are considered clean unless the shell is otherwise soiled.

      (2) Dirty: a shell with adhering dirt or prominent stains, or slight to moderate stains covering more than one-fourth (1/4) of the shell surface.

      (3) Unbroken: a shell that is free from checks or breaks.

      (4) Checked or cracked. A checked or cracked shell is one that has an actual break in the shell, but its membranes are unbroken, and its contents do not leak.

      (5) Leaker. A leaker is an egg in which the shell and shell membrane are broken to the extent that the egg contents are exuding, or are free to exude through the shell.

      (6) Normal. A normal shell is one that approximates the usual shape, and that is of good even texture, and strength, and free from distinct ridges, rough areas, thin spots or other conditions not common to good shells. Slight ridges and rough areas that do not affect materially the shape, texture and strength of the shell are permitted.

      (7) Slightly abnormal: a shell that may be somewhat unusual in shape, or one that may be somewhat faulty in texture or strength. It may also show distinct but not pronounced ridges, thin spots, or rough areas.

      (8) Abnormal: a shell that may be decidedly misshapen or that may be decidedly faulty in texture or strength or that may show pronounced ridges, rough spots or other defects.

      (9) Depth of air cell. The depth of the air cell, when in its natural position is the distance from the large end of the egg to the plane passing through the egg at the point where the lower air cell membrane touches the shell.

      (10) Practically regular air cell: an air cell that maintains a practically fixed position in the egg and shows a fairly even outline, with no more than one-eighth (1/8) inch movement in any direction as the egg is rotated.

      (11) Free air cell: an air cell that moves freely toward the uppermost point in the egg as the egg is rotated slowly.

      (12) Bubbly air cell: a ruptured air cell resulting in one (1) or more small separate air bubbles usually floating beneath the main air cell.

 

      Section 2. The albumen requirements in the standards of quality for individual eggs shall be governed by the following specifications:

      (1) Clear: a white that is free from discoloration or from any foreign bodies floating in it. Prominent chalazas should not be confused with foreign bodies such as spots or blood clots.

      (2) Firm: a white that is sufficiently thick or viscous to permit but unlimited movement of the yolk from the center of the egg, thus preventing the yolk outline from being more than slightly outlined, when the egg is twirled.

      (3) Reasonably firm: a white that is somewhat less thick or viscous than a firm white. A reasonably firm white permits the yolk to move somewhat more freely from its normal position in the center of the egg, and approach the shell more closely. This would result in a fairly well defined yolk outline when the egg is twirled.

      (4) Slightly weak: a white that is lacking in thickness or viscosity to the extent that permits the yolk to move quite freely from its normal position in the egg. A slightly weak white will cause the yolk outline to appear well defined when the egg is twirled.

      (5) Weak and watery: a white that is thin and generally lacking in viscosity. A weak and watery white permits the yolk to move freely from the center of the egg, and to approach the shell more closely, thus causing the yolk outline to appear plainly visible and dark when the egg is twirled.

      (6) Small blood clots and meat spots not due to germ development. These blood clots may have lost their characteristic red color and appear as small spots or foreign material commonly referred to as meat spots. Such blood clots or spots are incorporated in the egg during its formation and after the yolk leaves the ovary.

      (7) Bloody whites: an egg, the white of which has blood diffused through it. Such conditions may be present in new-laid eggs. Eggs with bloody whites are classed as inedible.

 

      Section 3. They yolk requirements in the standards of quality for individual eggs shall be governed by the following specifications:

      (1) Well centered: a yolk that occupies the center of the egg and moves only slightly from that position as the egg is twirled.

      (2) Fairly well centered: a yolk that is not more than one-fourth (1/4) of the distance from its normal central position toward the ends of the eggs, and swings not more than one-half (1/2) of the distance from its normal position toward the sides of the egg as it is twirled.

      (3) Off center: a yolk which is distinctly above or below center and swings close to the sides of the egg as it is twirled.

      (4) Outline slightly defined: a yolk outline that is indistinctly indicated, and appears to blend into the surrounding white as the egg is twirled.

      (5) Outline fairly well defined: a yolk outline that is discernible, but not clearly outlined as the egg is twirled.

      (6) Outline well defined: a yolk that is quite definite and distinct as the egg is twirled.

      (7) Outline plainly visible: a yolk outline that is plainly visible as a dark shadow, when the egg is twirled.

      (8) Slightly enlarged and slightly flattened: a yolk in which the yolk membranes and tissues have weakened somewhat causing it to appear slightly enlarged and slightly flattened.

      (9) Enlarged and flattened: a yolk in which the yolk membranes have weakened, also the tissues are weakened, and moisture has been absorbed from the white to such an extent that it appears definitely enlarged and flat.

      (10) Free from defects: a yolk that shows no spots or areas on its surface indicating the presence of germ development or other defects.

      (11) Practically free from defects: a yolk that shows no germ development but may show other very slight defects on its surface.

      (12) Definite but not serious defects: a yolk that may show definite spots or areas on its surface but with only slight indication of germ development or other pronounced or serious defects.

      (13) Other serious defects: a yolk that shows well developed spots or areas and other serious defects such as olive yolks, which do not render the egg inedible.

      (14) Clearly visible germ development: a development of the germ spot on the yolk of a fertile egg that has progressed to a point where it is plainly visible as a definite circular area or spot with no blood in evidence.

      (15) Blood due to germ development: blood caused by development of the germ in a fertile egg to the point where it is visible as definite lines or blood rings. Such eggs are classified as inedible. (Agr: Egg:Ss30, Sa40, Sy50; 1 Ky.R. 736; eff. 5-14-75.)